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Granbury Texas - Elevate Realty Group Real Estate News and Information

Can You Be-Leaf It's Gutter Maintenance Time Again?

Standing under the giant gold umbrella of foliage that covered your majestic shade tree this fall was like wandering into a painting, but now that the leaves have all fallen and the stately guardian is beginning its winter rest, it’s time to consider the clean up. You’ve already mulched the leaves on the lawn, but that’s only the beginning. Your gutters were also gracious receptacle of those golden flags — they’re going to need a good cleaning to keep working like they should.

Getting the Muck Out

There’s no easy way to say this, so I’m just going to come out with it. All that gross, grimey stuff in your gutters has to go and there’s not really a hands-off way to do this that’s both safe and reliable. The very best way to clean your gutters is still to don some work gloves, mount a ladder and use a garden trowel to scrape out all the detris that’s accumulated since the last time you or the former owner of your home did this vile task.

Try very hard to not push any of that debris down into the downspouts. Once inside the downspout, that mess of rotting leaf matter can turn into the most epic clog you can imagine, requiring a Herculean effort to extract. That is not what you want to spend doing this weekend. Instead, start at the downspout and work toward the middle of the gutter, and then repeat on the other side if it also has a downspout.

You can toss the mess into a bucket you’ve carefully hung from your nifty ladder, lay a tarp down to catch whatever you toss on it or have a friend on the ground who gets to be the unlucky bearer of the compost pail. Just try to get most of the muck in the container or he won’t come back to help you fix that chimney cap.

Once all the muck’s cleaned out, you should then run a hose to rinse the silty deposits out of the bottom of the gutters until they shine. This will also show you if there are any leaks or sagging spots...

Getting Your Garden and Landscape Ready for Winter

There’s nothing quite as solemn as watching the garden and landscape start to wind down for a long winter’s rest. It’s part of the never-ending cycle of nature — and landscaping chores — that you’ll find yourself participating in as a homeowner. Shed a small tear for the beauty of the cycle, then head out to the garage because you’ve got a lot of work to do to get your garden and landscape ready for winter.

Ready? Here we go!

Begin at the Beginning

Every landscape and garden is different, but it can be generally agreed upon that your landscape consists of some kind of turf (grass), some shrubs or small trees, maybe a large tree, annuals, perennials, bulbs, a garden spot and potted plants. Give or take. All of these guys are competing with you for attention as fall turns to winter — they’re screaming your name, in fact. But you can’t tend them all at the same time, which is why you need to make a plan of attack before you ever start.

Things that absolutely have to be done before it frosts for the first time include:

  1. Bringing tender potted plants indoors.
  2. Covering tender outdoor plants.
  3. Mulching everything you’d like to see next year.
  4. Saying good-bye to the rest.

You can wait until there’s a freeze warning in effect to handle chores like:

  1. Digging bulbs.
  2. Turning over the vegetable garden.
  3. Trimming away dead material from trees and shrubs.
  4. Mowing the grass one last time.

Although we’d never advocate that you wait until the last minute to do any of these chores, we also know you’re probably pretty busy, so it makes more sense to let you know what the deadlines really are. With this information in hand, you can start planning your attack.

Mulching 101

One of the most important things you’ll do when you’re putting...